These Are The 10 Best Places To Buy A House In Georgia For 2019


Using science and data, we can tell you which places in Georgia have seen home prices rising and people flocking over the past year.

Editor’s note: This is not investment advice and we are not financial advisers. Article updated for 2019.

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There’s a the age old question everyone thinks about when they decide to move to a city in Georgia:

Should I buy a place or rent?

Well, we aren’t here today to solve that problem for you exactly. We are just assuming you’ll do the right thing and a buy a place 😉

And while we are happy to tell you the best place to live in Georgia, this analysis is going to tackle the question of the best place to buy a house as an investor. That is we are going to try and determine the up and coming cities in the Peach State.

To do that we are going to look at places in Georgia that are growing faster than average, but where home prices are below average. In every day terms, the “deals”.

The best deal in Georgia at the moment? That would be Locust Grove according to our analysis.

Here’s a look at the top ten places to buy a home in Georgia for 2019:

  1. Locust Grove (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  2. Hampton (Homes For Sale)
  3. Stone Mountain (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  4. Clarkston (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  5. Morrow (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  6. Buford (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  7. Garden City (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  8. Stockbridge (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  9. Lovejoy (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  10. Braselton (Photos | Homes For Sale)

The methodology that wen’t into this can be a bit complicated, so we’ll break it down for you in as much detail as we can below.

If you’re not worried about finding a deal on good places to live, check out the most expensive places to live in Georgia and, for those of you on a budget, the cheapest places to live in Georgia.

For more Georgia reading, check out:

How do you determine the best places to buy a home in Georgia for 2019?

We were in real estate for almost five years and have been working on this site for another three. Suffice is to say, we’ve put a lot of thought into what goes into finding a good place to buy a home.

So all that thinking has come to this moment where we get to spell out how we’d approach finding an up-and-coming place to live in Georgia. Put differently, the analysis will try to find places in Georgia with undervalued homes relative to pent up demand.

To do that we looked at the most recent American Community Survey Census data for 2013-2017 and compared it to the previous vintage (2012-2016). Specifically, we used the following criteria:

  • Y-o-Y Change In Population (People want to live here)
  • Y-o-Y Change In Median Home Prices (People are willing to pay for it)
  • Home Prices Relative To The State Average (It’s still kinda cheap)

We want places that are growing, have seen home prices increase in recent years, and are still “cheap” for Georgia with the following caveats:

So of the 620 cities and towns in Georgia, only 125 places made it through our initial filters to even be considered.

We then ranked each place from 1 to 125 for the criteria mentioned above with 1 being the best for that criteria. We averaged the rankings to create a “best place to buy” index with the place having the lowest index being the best.

Turns out that Locust Grove is the best potential gem in the not-so-rough in the Peach State.

Read on for more on these places.

Locust Grove, GA

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

4
/10

Population: 6,340
Median Home Price: $114,700
Population Change: 10.4%
Home Price Change: 9.3%
More on Locust Grove: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

The city of Locust Grove derived its name from a grove of locust trees that could be seen throughout the town. Locust Grove was a major rail distribution center for cotton, peaches and other farm products. The city had three cotton gins and several warehouses. In 1870, the first store was built on Main Street. Since that time many new businesses have moved to Locust Grove.

Overall SnackAbility

6
/10

Population: 7,463
Median Home Price: $132,800
Population Change: 2.5%
Home Price Change: 13.8%
More on Hampton: Homes For Sale | Data

The city was once known as “Bear Creek” or “Bear Creek Station”, named after a creek that runs through the area. The town was moved, established and renamed in 1873 when the Central Railroad of Georgia was built approx. one mile to the east. It was named after Brig. General Wade Hampton, an American soldier in the Revolutionary War and War of 1812.

Stone Mountain, GA

Overall SnackAbility

4
/10

Population: 6,209
Median Home Price: $89,900
Population Change: 1.8%
Home Price Change: 7.0%
More on Stone Mountain: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

In 1822, the area that now makes up the city of Stone Mountain was made a part of the newly formed DeKalb County. A post office was created in 1834 on the old Augusta Road, and Andrew Johnson built a hotel along the road in 1836. At around the same time, Aaron Cloud built an observation tower at the summit of the mountain. Visitors to the mountain would travel to the area by rail and road, and then hike up the 1.1-mile mountaintop trail to the top, where Cloud also had a restaurant and club.

Clarkston, GA

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

3
/10

Population: 12,702
Median Home Price: $110,200
Population Change: 0.9%
Home Price Change: 14.1%
More on Clarkston: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

Morrow, GA

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

4
/10

Population: 7,076
Median Home Price: $105,300
Population Change: 0.1%
Home Price Change: 17.8%
More on Morrow: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

Morrow was founded in 1846 with the advent of the railroad into the area. It was incorporated as a city in 1943.

Buford, GA

Overall SnackAbility

6
/10

Population: 14,662
Median Home Price: $182,500
Population Change: 5.3%
Home Price Change: 12.1%
More on Buford: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

Buford appears in historical records beginning in the early 19th century. The area that is now Buford was originally part of Cherokee territory. Despite the treaty in 1817 that ceded the territory to the United States and Gwinnett County’s legislative establishment in 1818, the area was still largely inhabited by the Cherokee until the 1830s. The first non-Native Americans moved to the Buford area in the late 1820s or early 1830s, although the Buford area was not largely settled by them until the 1860s.

Garden City, GA

Overall SnackAbility

6
/10

Population: 8,961
Median Home Price: $120,200
Population Change: 0.8%
Home Price Change: 14.2%
More on Garden City: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

From the Reconstruction Era until the 1930s, the area was home to three major plantations: Brampton, Givens and Telfair. Garden City was incorporated on February 8, 1939, as “Industrial City Gardens”. It received its current name on March 24, 1941.

Stockbridge, GA

Overall SnackAbility

6
/10

Population: 28,117
Median Home Price: $150,700
Population Change: 1.5%
Home Price Change: 16.2%
More on Stockbridge: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

The area was settled in 1829 when Concord Methodist Church was organized near present-day Old Stagecoach Road. It was granted a post office on April 5, 1847, named for a traveling professor, Levi Stockbridge, who passed through the area many times before the post office was built. He was said to be well known and respected in his namesake community. Others contend that the city was named after Thomas Stock, who was State Surveyor and president of the Georgia State Senate in the 1820s.

Lovejoy, GA

Overall SnackAbility

5
/10

Population: 6,594
Median Home Price: $91,300
Population Change: 5.5%
Home Price Change: 0.9%
More on Lovejoy: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

Braselton, GA

Overall SnackAbility

9
/10

Population: 9,316
Median Home Price: $288,000
Population Change: 10.8%
Home Price Change: 14.3%
More on Braselton: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

The town is named after Harrison Braselton, a poor dirt farmer who married Susan Hosch, the daughter of a rich plantation owner. Braselton built a home on 786 acres of land he purchased north of the Hosch Plantation. The land he purchased was later called Braselton.

There You Have It – The Best Places To Purchase A House In Georgia for 2019

There’s our analysis of the best places to buy a house in Georgia. And, to be clear, we aren’t necessarily saying these places are the best places to live, just that it looks like they might be in a couple of years based on the data.

In fact, every place in the following table meets our criteria, so even though it may not look super long, remember we started off with all 620 places in the state.

So if we’d could rent or buy in these cities, we’d definitely buy.

For more Georgia reading, check out:

Detailed List Of The Best Places To Buy A Home In Georgia

City Rank Median Home Price Population Change Home Price Increase
Locust Grove 1 $114,700 10.4% 9.3%
Hampton 2 $132,800 2.5% 13.8%
Stone Mountain 3 $89,900 1.8% 7.0%
Clarkston 4 $110,200 0.9% 14.1%
Morrow 5 $105,300 0.1% 17.8%
Buford 6 $182,500 5.3% 12.1%
Garden City 7 $120,200 0.8% 14.2%
Stockbridge 8 $150,700 1.5% 16.2%
Lovejoy 9 $91,300 5.5% 0.9%
Braselton 10 $288,000 10.8% 14.3%
Forest Park 11 $58,300 0.6% 5.6%
Flowery Branch 12 $201,700 4.6% 11.8%
Swainsboro 13 $77,200 -1.8% 14.4%
Austell 14 $113,900 2.4% 4.6%
Conyers 15 $112,300 0.8% 9.1%
Commerce 16 $104,800 1.2% 6.5%
East Point 17 $96,900 -0.3% 10.2%
Dacula 18 $133,500 6.2% 4.1%
Covington 19 $128,300 0.4% 11.4%
Sugar Hill 20 $189,600 3.6% 8.9%
Union City 21 $81,900 1.1% 2.5%
Holly Springs 22 $222,600 4.4% 8.9%
Loganville 23 $162,900 2.6% 8.0%
Riverdale 24 $83,600 0.8% 4.1%
Villa Rica 25 $139,700 1.0% 9.4%
Cumming 26 $210,800 2.0% 14.1%
Mcdonough 27 $141,300 1.8% 6.8%
Palmetto 28 $80,700 3.3% -9.2%
Fayetteville 29 $205,900 1.7% 12.3%
Sylvester 30 $91,200 -2.0% 14.0%
Kennesaw 31 $163,200 2.3% 6.8%
Adel 32 $92,700 -0.2% 6.8%
Auburn 33 $116,400 0.3% 7.6%
Woodstock 34 $205,800 4.5% 6.8%
Suwanee 35 $273,100 3.6% 8.7%
Jefferson 36 $168,700 3.1% 6.2%
Decatur 37 $418,700 3.8% 9.0%
Monroe 38 $120,500 0.3% 8.0%
Lagrange 39 $126,600 -0.3% 9.4%
Pooler 40 $206,200 1.6% 9.7%
Winder 41 $131,500 1.7% 4.0%
Eatonton 42 $81,900 0.2% 3.3%
Canton 43 $185,700 3.1% 6.4%
Barnesville 44 $112,100 -0.9% 8.8%
Fairburn 45 $119,200 2.9% -0.3%
Camilla 46 $86,800 -1.2% 6.4%
Cartersville 47 $156,000 0.3% 11.0%
Smyrna 48 $248,600 1.2% 10.4%
Chamblee 49 $231,900 2.0% 7.4%
Norcross 50 $184,600 1.1% 8.8%
Grovetown 51 $146,700 3.9% 1.1%
Atlanta 52 $238,700 1.9% 7.4%
Waynesboro 53 $84,300 -2.6% 6.8%
Bremen 54 $165,800 -0.5% 15.9%
Hapeville 55 $106,500 -0.5% 5.7%
Dalton 56 $136,200 -0.3% 8.4%
Rome 57 $141,600 -0.9% 11.3%
Newnan 58 $185,300 3.2% 3.8%
Dallas 59 $134,400 1.1% 3.9%
Cedartown 60 $81,400 0.3% -0.5%
Brookhaven 61 $419,800 1.6% 8.9%
Waycross 62 $67,700 -1.3% 2.7%
Lafayette 63 $82,900 0.1% 0.4%
Duluth 64 $199,300 1.1% 8.4%
Vidalia 65 $116,900 -0.7% 6.2%
Warner Robins 66 $110,500 1.2% -1.0%
Doraville 67 $151,800 0.9% 5.6%
Powder Springs 68 $145,100 1.2% 3.8%
Byron 69 $163,000 2.2% 1.9%
Eastman 70 $85,000 -0.9% 2.3%
Acworth 71 $164,000 1.6% 3.8%
Sandersville 72 $86,800 -1.8% 4.2%
Fort Valley 73 $76,400 -2.1% 3.2%
Douglasville 74 $153,500 1.4% 2.9%
Port Wentworth 75 $163,800 7.3% -2.3%
Marietta 76 $242,000 0.8% 8.2%
Fort Oglethorpe 77 $123,100 0.8% 1.2%
Toccoa 78 $87,500 -0.8% 0.8%
Gainesville 79 $172,300 -1.6% 14.7%
Perry 80 $135,500 2.2% -4.6%
Peachtree Corners 81 $308,200 1.5% 5.6%
Kingsland 82 $143,300 0.9% 1.6%
Alpharetta 83 $364,900 1.5% 6.0%
Snellville 84 $156,000 0.6% 4.0%
Thomaston 85 $79,000 -1.5% -0.4%
Fitzgerald 86 $86,200 -1.4% 0.9%
Cordele 87 $80,300 -1.0% -1.8%
Albany 88 $101,000 -1.0% 1.4%
Carrollton 89 $137,900 0.4% 2.5%
Milton 90 $494,300 2.2% 4.0%
Statesboro 91 $117,000 0.2% 0.3%
Dunwoody 92 $398,400 1.5% 4.4%
Jesup 93 $117,500 -2.4% 6.0%
Sandy Springs 94 $440,500 1.5% 4.5%
Centerville 95 $146,000 0.9% -0.2%
Richmond Hill 96 $188,500 2.3% -0.8%
Brunswick 97 $91,800 -0.5% -4.2%
Griffin 98 $98,900 -0.7% -1.1%
Lilburn 99 $168,800 0.6% 3.3%
Lawrenceville 100 $154,400 -2.8% 8.8%

About Chris Kolmar

Chris Kolmar has been in the real estate business for almost ten years now. He originally worked for Movoto Real Estate as the director of marketing before founding HomeSnacks.

He believes the key to finding the right place to live comes down to looking at the data, reading about things to do, and, most importantly, checking it out yourself before you move.

If you've been looking for a place to live in the past several years, you've probably stumbled upon his writing already.

You can find out more about him on LinkedIn or his website.

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