These Are The 10 Best Places To Buy A House In Ohio For 2019


Using science and data, we can tell you which places in Ohio have seen home prices rising and people flocking over the past year.

Editor’s note: This is not investment advice and we are not financial advisers. Article updated for 2019.

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There’s a the age old question everyone thinks about when they decide to move to a city in Ohio:

Should I buy a place or rent?

Well, we aren’t here today to solve that problem for you exactly. We are just assuming you’ll do the right thing and a buy a place 😉

And while we are happy to tell you the best place to live in Ohio, this analysis is going to tackle the question of the best place to buy a house as an investor. That is we are going to try and determine the up and coming cities in the Buckeye State.

To do that we are going to look at places in Ohio that are growing faster than average, but where home prices are below average. In every day terms, the “deals”.

The best deal in Ohio at the moment? That would be Kenton according to our analysis.

Here’s a look at the top ten places to buy a home in Ohio for 2019:

  1. Kenton (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  2. New Lexington (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  3. Moraine (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  4. Shelby (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  5. Defiance (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  6. Northwood (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  7. Trenton (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  8. Columbus (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  9. Van Wert (Photos | Homes For Sale)
  10. London (Photos | Homes For Sale)

The methodology that wen’t into this can be a bit complicated, so we’ll break it down for you in as much detail as we can below.

If you’re not worried about finding a deal on good places to live, check out the most expensive places to live in Ohio and, for those of you on a budget, the cheapest places to live in Ohio.

For more Ohio reading, check out:

How do you determine the best places to buy a home in Ohio for 2019?

We were in real estate for almost five years and have been working on this site for another three. Suffice is to say, we’ve put a lot of thought into what goes into finding a good place to buy a home.

So all that thinking has come to this moment where we get to spell out how we’d approach finding an up-and-coming place to live in Ohio. Put differently, the analysis will try to find places in Ohio with undervalued homes relative to pent up demand.

To do that we looked at the most recent American Community Survey Census data for 2013-2017 and compared it to the previous vintage (2012-2016). Specifically, we used the following criteria:

  • Y-o-Y Change In Population (People want to live here)
  • Y-o-Y Change In Median Home Prices (People are willing to pay for it)
  • Home Prices Relative To The State Average (It’s still kinda cheap)

We want places that are growing, have seen home prices increase in recent years, and are still “cheap” for Ohio with the following caveats:

So of the 1,203 cities and towns in Ohio, only 256 places made it through our initial filters to even be considered.

We then ranked each place from 1 to 256 for the criteria mentioned above with 1 being the best for that criteria. We averaged the rankings to create a “best place to buy” index with the place having the lowest index being the best.

Turns out that Kenton is the best potential gem in the not-so-rough in the Buckeye State.

Read on for more on these places.

Kenton, OH

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

5
/10

Population: 8,265
Median Home Price: $77,600
Population Change: 7.1%
Home Price Change: 4.4%
More on Kenton: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

In 1845, Kenton was incorporated as a village; it became a city in 1886. The city was named after frontiersman Simon Kenton.

New Lexington, OH

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

4
/10

Population: 5,049
Median Home Price: $81,500
Population Change: 1.1%
Home Price Change: 7.2%
More on New Lexington: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

Moraine, OH

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

4
/10

Population: 6,433
Median Home Price: $89,100
Population Change: 1.4%
Home Price Change: 10.0%
More on Moraine: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

What is now the city of Moraine was once a part of Van Buren Township followed by a brief period as a part of Kettering. Citizens of the Moraine area seceded from Kettering forming the new Moraine Township in 1953, before incorporating as a municipality in 1957. Moraine later annexed parts of Miami and Jefferson townships.

Shelby, OH

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

5
/10

Population: 8,878
Median Home Price: $93,700
Population Change: 1.5%
Home Price Change: 4.0%
More on Shelby: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

Defiance, OH

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

7
/10

Population: 16,848
Median Home Price: $104,700
Population Change: 0.7%
Home Price Change: 5.9%
More on Defiance: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

The city contains the site of Fort Defiance, built by General “Mad” Anthony Wayne in August 1794, during the Northwest Indian War, at the confluence of the Auglaize and Maumee rivers. General Wayne surveyed the land and declared to General Scott, “I defy the English, Indians, and all the devils of hell to take it.” This area became Fort Defiance. Today a pair of cannons outside the city library on the Maumee River overlook the confluence and mark the location of Fort Defiance, along with a mounded outline of the fort walls. The city was named after Fort Defiance.

Northwood, OH

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

8
/10

Population: 5,358
Median Home Price: $118,500
Population Change: 0.4%
Home Price Change: 9.4%
More on Northwood: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

Northwood was originally Ross Township. It was the northernmost township in Wood County from its establishment on April 18, 1874 until December 1, 1962. Farms, gardens, orchards, and railroads covered the area located just south of east Toledo. In 1898 Edward Ford’s glass factory was built along the Maumee River, which ultimately led to the incorporation of the village of Rossford in 1939 within the western portion of the township. Ross Township was then divided so that Rossford Township would serve as a barrier between Rossford and the remaining Ross Township. On December 1, 1962, Ross Township ceased to exist when it became incorporated as the city of Northwood, so aptly named because of its location at the top of Wood County. With its departure, Wood County dropped its number of townships from 20 to 19.

Trenton, OH

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

5
/10

Population: 12,601
Median Home Price: $129,800
Population Change: 1.0%
Home Price Change: 4.9%
More on Trenton: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

Trenton was originally called Bloomfield, and under the latter name was platted in 1815. Bloomfield was named for Joseph Bloomfield, governor of New Jersey. In 1831, it was discovered that there was already a Bloomfield post office in Ohio, and so the town was renamed after the state capital of New Jersey at Trenton.

Columbus, OH

Overall SnackAbility

6
/10

Population: 852,144
Median Home Price: $136,500
Population Change: 1.8%
Home Price Change: 3.6%
More on Columbus: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

The area including modern-day Columbus once comprised the Ohio Country, under the nominal control of the French colonial empire through the Viceroyalty of New France from 1663 until 1763. In the 18th century, European traders flocked to the area, attracted by the fur trade.|The area found itself frequently caught between warring factions, including American Indian and European interests. In the 1740s, Pennsylvania traders overran the territory until the French forcibly evicted them. In the early 1750s, the Ohio Company sent George Washington to the Ohio Country to survey. Fighting for control of the territory in the French and Indian War became part of the international Seven Years’ War. During this period, the region routinely suffered turmoil, massacres, and battles. The 1763 Treaty of Paris ceded the Ohio Country to the British Empire.

Van Wert, OH

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

6
/10

Population: 10,946
Median Home Price: $82,600
Population Change: 1.9%
Home Price Change: 0.2%
More on Van Wert: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

Van Wert was surveyed in 1824 by Captain James Riley, who was contracted by the government to survey lands purchased from Native Americans under a treaty in 1818.

London, OH

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

7
/10

Population: 10,087
Median Home Price: $135,100
Population Change: 0.3%
Home Price Change: 7.5%
More on London: PhotosHomes For Sale | Data

Soon after the village was platted in the early 1810s, a Methodist church was founded in the community. Today known as First United Methodist Church, this congregation built a small log church building in 1820; it was London’s first church. In the early 1900s, the church added facilities for the storage of human milk to sustain the orphanage it then operated.

There You Have It – The Best Places To Purchase A House In Ohio for 2019

There’s our analysis of the best places to buy a house in Ohio. And, to be clear, we aren’t necessarily saying these places are the best places to live, just that it looks like they might be in a couple of years based on the data.

In fact, every place in the following table meets our criteria, so even though it may not look super long, remember we started off with all 0 places in the state.

So if we’d could rent or buy in these cities, we’d definitely buy.

For more Ohio reading, check out:

Detailed List Of The Best Places To Buy A Home In Ohio

City Rank Median Home Price Population Change Home Price Increase
Kenton 1 $77,600 7.1% 4.4%
New Lexington 2 $81,500 1.1% 7.2%
Moraine 3 $89,100 1.4% 10.0%
Shelby 4 $93,700 1.5% 4.0%
Defiance 5 $104,700 0.7% 5.9%
Northwood 6 $118,500 0.4% 9.4%
Trenton 7 $129,800 1.0% 4.9%
Columbus 8 $136,500 1.8% 3.6%
Van Wert 9 $82,600 1.9% 0.2%
London 10 $135,100 0.3% 7.5%
Loveland 11 $191,800 1.9% 10.9%
Groveport 12 $153,200 1.1% 6.2%
Sunbury 13 $203,300 2.4% 9.1%
Norwood 14 $122,200 0.8% 2.9%
Washington Court House 15 $98,200 0.1% 2.7%
Wauseon 16 $123,400 0.2% 3.6%
Cincinnati 17 $124,200 0.3% 3.2%
Amelia 18 $146,900 0.8% 4.0%
Carlisle 19 $137,000 1.4% 2.4%
Hilliard 20 $222,400 3.9% 4.4%
Macedonia 21 $203,300 1.0% 7.2%
Delaware 22 $166,700 1.7% 3.5%
New Philadelphia 23 $111,100 -0.0% 3.5%
Pickerington 24 $193,500 1.3% 4.9%
Union 25 $93,800 -0.1% 2.6%
Grandview Heights 26 $313,700 2.6% 6.2%
Louisville 27 $138,100 0.2% 4.7%
Athens 28 $177,100 0.5% 7.8%
Grove City 29 $167,400 2.3% 3.1%
West Carrollton 30 $96,500 -0.4% 6.4%
North Ridgeville 31 $164,900 1.9% 2.9%
Heath 32 $131,600 0.7% 2.3%
Tiffin 33 $93,000 -0.4% 4.1%
Portsmouth 34 $74,000 -0.2% 1.8%
Grafton 35 $138,800 0.6% 2.8%
Franklin 36 $108,800 -0.3% 6.1%
Piqua 37 $86,200 0.2% 0.5%
Bexley 38 $328,300 0.9% 12.5%
Ironton 39 $93,700 -0.2% 2.5%
Riverside 40 $85,500 0.1% 0.7%
Hamilton 41 $102,300 -0.1% 2.4%
Sharonville 42 $144,500 1.4% 1.8%
Worthington 43 $261,300 2.0% 3.9%
Reynoldsburg 44 $146,700 0.5% 2.9%
Olmsted Falls 45 $151,900 0.2% 4.3%
Wilmington 46 $104,200 -0.4% 5.5%
Germantown 47 $127,600 -0.1% 3.7%
Newark 48 $116,300 0.3% 1.6%
Madeira 49 $266,400 0.8% 6.7%
Warren 50 $62,500 -0.5% 2.1%
Elyria 51 $96,200 0.0% 1.5%
Gahanna 52 $202,700 0.9% 3.9%
Whitehall 53 $82,100 0.8% -1.3%
Cleveland 54 $67,600 -0.1% 0.1%
Marysville 55 $173,600 0.3% 4.5%
Green 56 $186,100 0.1% 7.2%
Deer Park 57 $125,400 -0.1% 3.3%
Westerville 58 $214,300 1.4% 3.1%
Vermilion 59 $134,100 0.4% 1.7%
Lancaster 60 $118,100 0.6% 0.9%
Toronto 61 $78,900 0.9% -4.0%
Ada 62 $94,700 -2.4% 13.4%
Rittman 63 $105,300 1.0% -0.3%
Upper Arlington 64 $357,200 0.8% 5.7%
Middletown 65 $93,800 -0.4% 2.7%
Belpre 66 $106,500 -0.6% 8.1%
North Canton 67 $143,900 -0.1% 5.3%
Barberton 68 $86,800 -0.1% 1.2%
Mount Healthy 69 $83,800 0.3% -0.9%
Wooster 70 $131,600 -0.2% 4.2%
Highland Heights 71 $277,900 0.2% 12.6%
Willoughby Hills 72 $263,200 0.2% 7.8%
Powell 73 $359,400 1.8% 3.3%
Troy 74 $125,900 0.0% 2.0%
Canal Winchester 75 $176,800 2.7% 1.7%
Chillicothe 76 $107,600 -0.7% 8.8%
Canal Fulton 77 $145,200 -0.1% 4.9%
New Franklin 78 $139,900 -0.1% 3.9%
Dayton 79 $66,500 -0.1% -0.2%
Xenia 80 $93,100 0.3% -0.7%
Lakewood 81 $140,300 -0.2% 4.7%
Niles 82 $81,800 -1.4% 3.9%
Montgomery 83 $343,800 1.4% 3.3%
Pataskala 84 $166,900 0.6% 2.5%
Norton 85 $135,500 -0.0% 2.7%
Bellefontaine 86 $97,700 1.6% -3.6%
Sidney 87 $110,600 0.1% 1.0%
Akron 88 $80,100 -0.1% 0.1%
Delphos 89 $90,200 -1.3% 4.3%
Amherst 90 $149,400 0.2% 2.2%
Monroe 91 $164,200 2.9% 0.9%
Tallmadge 92 $161,300 0.1% 3.1%
Rocky River 93 $223,100 0.3% 3.4%
Alliance 94 $80,600 -0.4% 1.3%
John 95 $151,000 3.2% 0.3%
Springboro 96 $212,900 0.6% 2.6%
Harrison 97 $138,900 5.4% -0.4%
Cambridge 98 $84,500 -0.0% -0.6%
Brunswick 99 $163,100 0.2% 2.3%
Cheviot 100 $90,400 -0.1% 0.3%

About Chris Kolmar

Chris Kolmar has been in the real estate business for almost ten years now. He originally worked for Movoto Real Estate as the director of marketing before founding HomeSnacks.

He believes the key to finding the right place to live comes down to looking at the data, reading about things to do, and, most importantly, checking it out yourself before you move.

If you've been looking for a place to live in the past several years, you've probably stumbled upon his writing already.

You can find out more about him on LinkedIn or his website.

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