The 10 Cheapest Los Angeles, CA Neighborhoods To Live In For 2019


We used science and data to determine which neighborhoods in Los Angeles are the cheapest of the cheap.

Editor’s Note: This is our first time ranking the cheapest neighborhoods to live in Los Angeles.
Cheapest Neighborhoods In Los Angeles

Everything else equal, I think we can all agree that living in a cheaper place is better than living in a more expensive place.

I’d much rather pay $500/mo in rent than $1,000. And I’d rather pay $2 for coffee than $5.

And while every neighbhorhood in Los Angeles might be more expensive than living in rural California, there are certain neighborhoods that are definitely cheaper.

So what exactly are those Los Angeles neighborhoods where your dollar goes a little further — you can get that one bedroom instead of the studio?

Instead of relying on public opinion and speculation, we wanted to get the facts straight and find out which neighborhoods in Los Angeles are the cheapest.

What’s the cheapest neighborhood to live in Los Angeles for 2020? According to the most recent census data, Lakeview Terrace looks to be the cheaptest Los Angeles neighborhood to live in.

At this point we should make it clear that you do get what you pay for — some of these neighborhoods might not be the best places to live in Los Angeles. You could be sacrificing location or crime rates in return for more space and cheaper groceries.

Read on to see how we determined the places around Los Angeles that deserve a little bragging rights or maybe you’re interested in the worst neighborhoods in Los Angeles.

Once you’re done, you can look at the bottom of the story for a complete chart of every neighborhood we looked at from cheapest to most expensive.

For more California reading, check out:

How We Determined The Cheapest Los Angeles Hoods In 2020

In order to rank the cheapest places to live in Los Angeles, we had to determine what criteria defines “cheap”.

Using census and extrapolated BLS data, we arrived at the following set of criteria:

  • Overall Cost Of Living
  • Rent To Income Ratio
  • Median Home Value To Income Ratio

We then ranked each neighborhood with scores from 1 to 83 in each category, where 1 was the cheapest.

Next, we averaged the rankings for each neighborhood to create a cheap neighborhood index.

And finally, we crowned the neighborhood with the lowest cheapest neighborhood index the “Cheapest City Neighborhood In Los Angeles.” We’re lookin’ at you, Lakeview Terrace.

Read on below to learn more about what it’s like to live in the cheapest places Los Angeles. Or skip to the end to see the list of all the neighborhoods in the city from cheapest to most expensive.

The 10 Cheapest Neighborhoods To Live In Los Angeles For 2020

Overall SnackAbility

8
/10

Population: 14,460
Cost Of Living Index: 125 (14th cheapest)
Home Value To Income Ratio: 4.9 (4th cheapest)
Rent To Income Ratio: 0.018 (22nd cheapest)
More on Lakeview Terrace: Homes For Sale | Data

The median income in Lakeview Terrace comes in at $63,338 and the median home value is $310,747 for 2020.

Overall SnackAbility

8
/10

Population: 26,759
Cost Of Living Index: 124 (12th cheapest)
Home Value To Income Ratio: 6.1 (22nd cheapest)
Rent To Income Ratio: 0.017 (16th cheapest)
More on Crenshaw: Homes For Sale | Data

The median income in Crenshaw comes in at $53,326 and the median home value is $326,642 for 2020.

Overall SnackAbility

8.5
/10

Population: 21,104
Cost Of Living Index: 133 (30th cheapest)
Home Value To Income Ratio: 4.7 (3rd cheapest)
Rent To Income Ratio: 0.019 (23rd cheapest)
More on Mission Hills: Homes For Sale | Data

The median income in Mission Hills comes in at $76,104 and the median home value is $360,914 for 2020.

Overall SnackAbility

8.5
/10

Population: 19,165
Cost Of Living Index: 133 (30th cheapest)
Home Value To Income Ratio: 5.9 (20th cheapest)
Rent To Income Ratio: 0.015 (8th cheapest)
More on Sunland: Homes For Sale | Data

The median income in Sunland comes in at $67,316 and the median home value is $399,675 for 2020.

Overall SnackAbility

8.5
/10

Population: 46,531
Cost Of Living Index: 126 (18th cheapest)
Home Value To Income Ratio: 5.4 (7th cheapest)
Rent To Income Ratio: 0.021 (35th cheapest)
More on Arleta: Homes For Sale | Data

The median income in Arleta comes in at $60,040 and the median home value is $321,512 for 2020.

Fashion District Los Angeles, CA

Overall SnackAbility

5
/10

Population: 2,466
Cost Of Living Index: 98 (1st cheapest)
Home Value To Income Ratio: 2.2 (1st cheapest)
Rent To Income Ratio: 0.025 (62nd cheapest)
More on Fashion District: Homes For Sale | Data

The Los Angeles Fashion District is a design, warehouse, and distribution nexus of the clothing, accessories and fabric industry in Downtown Los Angeles. The Fashion District spans 90 blocks and is the hub of the apparel industry on the West Coast of the United States.

Thousands of fast-fashion wholesale vendors line the streets of the Los Angeles Fashion District. Fast-fashion vendors stock the most recent fashion trends straight from the catwalk.

The median income in Fashion District comes in at $39,866 and the median home value is $89,350 for 2020.

Overall SnackAbility

9
/10

Population: 39,335
Cost Of Living Index: 132 (28th cheapest)
Home Value To Income Ratio: 5.4 (9th cheapest)
Rent To Income Ratio: 0.02 (31st cheapest)
More on Panorama City: Homes For Sale | Data

The median income in Panorama City comes in at $66,293 and the median home value is $360,041 for 2020.

Wilmington Los Angeles, CA

Overall SnackAbility

8
/10

Population: 61,534
Cost Of Living Index: 125 (14th cheapest)
Home Value To Income Ratio: 6.6 (25th cheapest)
Rent To Income Ratio: 0.021 (37th cheapest)
More on Wilmington: Homes For Sale | Data

Wilmington is a neighborhood in the Los Angeles Harbor Region area of Los Angeles, California, covering 9.14 square miles.

Featuring a heavy concentration of industry and the third-largest oil field in the United States, it is considered sparsely populated in comparison with the city as a whole and within the city it is distinguished by its youthful population and high percentage of Latino and foreign-born residents.

It is the site of Los Angeles Harbor College, Banning High School and ten other primary and secondary schools. Wilmington has six parks, including one on the waterfront.

The median income in Wilmington comes in at $49,496 and the median home value is $326,871 for 2020.

Overall SnackAbility

9.5
/10

Population: 31,007
Cost Of Living Index: 164 (58th cheapest)
Home Value To Income Ratio: 5.7 (14th cheapest)
Rent To Income Ratio: 0.015 (9th cheapest)
More on West Hills: Homes For Sale | Data

The median income in West Hills comes in at $109,439 and the median home value is $619,850 for 2020.

Overall SnackAbility

9
/10

Population: 43,697
Cost Of Living Index: 150 (53rd cheapest)
Home Value To Income Ratio: 5.7 (13th cheapest)
Rent To Income Ratio: 0.017 (15th cheapest)
More on Granada Hills: Homes For Sale | Data

The median income in Granada Hills comes in at $89,035 and the median home value is $504,116 for 2020.

Summing Up The Cheapest Places In Los Angeles

If you’re measuring the neighborhoods in Los Angeles where prices are low and it’s cheap to live, this is an accurate list.

As we mentioned earlier, the neighborhoods in Los Angeles aren’t all cheap. Sawtelle takes the title of the most expensive neighborhood to live in Los Angeles.

We ranked the neighborhoods from cheapest to most expensive in the chart below.

For more California reading, check out:

Detailed List Of The Cheapest Neighborhoods To Live In Los Angeles For 2020

Rank Neighborhood Cost Of Living Index
1 Lakeview Terrace 125
2 Crenshaw 124
3 Mission Hills 133
4 Sunland 133
5 Arleta 126
6 Fashion District 98
7 Panorama City 132
8 Wilmington 125
9 West Hills 164
10 Granada Hills 150
11 South Park 116
12 Winnetka 139
13 North Hills 127
14 Downtown 111
15 Harbor City 128
16 Sylmar 131
17 Northridge 146
18 Westchester 165
19 Canoga Park 134
20 Civic Center-Little Tokyo 126
21 Chatsworth 150
22 Pacoima 124
23 Westlake 109
24 New Downtown 123
25 Tujunga 135
26 Shadow Hills 142
27 Sun Valley 131
28 Eagle Rock 148
29 Mount Washington 146
30 San Pedro 141
31 Wholesale District-Skid Row 111
32 El Sereno 130
33 Encino 178
34 Leiment Park 139
35 Central City 116
36 Tarzana 178
37 Watts 112
38 Woodland Hills 172
39 Portar Ranch 182
40 Studio City 193
41 Hyde Park 127
42 Reseda 137
43 Beverly Glen 203
44 Boyle Heights 123
45 Southeast Los Angeles 118
46 West Adams 126
47 Palms 145
48 Hollywood 126
49 Jefferson Park 132
50 Glendale 196
51 Harbor Gateway 135
52 Valley Village 159
53 Cypress Park 148
54 North Hollywood 136
55 Van Nuys 138
56 Brentwood 282
57 South Los Angeles 123
58 Silver Lake 161
59 Playa Del Ray 197
60 Los Feliz 176
61 Glassell Park 150
62 Pacific Palisades 294
63 Playa Vista 167
64 Bel Air 308
65 Century City 215
66 Mid Wilshire 148
67 Atwater Village 166
68 Toluca Lake 202
69 Hollywood Hills 220
70 West Los Angeles 222
71 Central City East 136
72 Mar Vista 184
73 Highland Park 140
74 Mid City West 182
75 Montecito Heights 134
76 Echo Park 156
77 Pico-Robertson 173
78 Chinatown 131
79 Mid City 138
80 Venice 222
81 Lincoln Heights 132
82 Westwood 193
83 Sawtelle 184

About Chris Kolmar

Chris Kolmar has been in the real estate business for almost ten years now. He originally worked for Movoto Real Estate as the director of marketing before founding HomeSnacks.

He believes the key to finding the right place to live comes down to looking at the data, reading about things to do, and, most importantly, checking it out yourself before you move.

If you've been looking for a place to live in the past several years, you've probably stumbled upon his writing already.

You can find out more about him on LinkedIn or his website.

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