These Are The 10 Most Diverse Cities In Missouri For 2019


We used data and science to determine the most diverse cities in Missouri.

Editor’s Note: We updated this article for 2019. This is our third time ranking the most diverse places in Missouri.


Most Diverse Cities In Missouri

Article continues below.

Race relations in America seem to be hitting a tipping point.

While we still haven’t dealt with racism as a society, the election of Donald Trump to the presidency has only flamed the tensions that have been mounting for years.

Part of the reason for that tension? The country as a whole continues to self segregate across race, income, and party lines. But it’s not all bad on the race relations front.

There are parts of Missouri where there’s a high level of diversity — where people of all walks of life come together. We decided to shine a light on those places today.

Using a standard measure of diversity, we ranked all 129 cities in Missouri from most to least diverse.

So what city is the most diverse in Missouri? According to the most Census data, Grandview took the number one over all spot for diversity in Missouri.

Read on below to see how we crunched the numbers and how your town ranked. To see where Missouri ranked as a state, we have a ranking of the most diverse states in Ameria.

And if you already knew these places were diverse, check out:

How we determined the most diverse cities in Missouri for 2019

We still believe in the accuracy of data — especially from the census. So that’s where we went to get the breakdown of race across Missouri.

That lead us to the Census’s most recently available data, the 2013-2017 American Community Survey data from the US Census.

Specifically, we looked at table B03002: HISPANIC OR LATINO ORIGIN BY RACE. Here are the category names as defined by the Census:

  • White alone*
  • Black or African American alone*
  • American Indian and Alaska Native alone*
  • Asian alone*
  • Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone*
  • Some other race alone*
  • Two or more races*
  • Hispanic or Latino
* Not hispanic or latino

We limited our analysis to non-CDPs with a population greater than 5,000 people. That left us with 129 cities.

We then calculated the HHI for each city by finding the racial breakdown of a city in percent terms, squaring them, and then adding the squares together. This left us with scores ranging from 3,581 (Grandview) to 9,569 (Savannah).

Finally, we ranked each city based on the HHI with a lower score being more diverse than a high score. Grandview took the distinction of being the most diverse, while Savannah was the least diverse city.

Read on for more information on how the cities in Missouri ranked for diversity or, for a more general take on diversity in america, head over to our ranking of the most diverse cities in America.

The 10 Most Diverse Places In Missouri For 2019

Grandview, MO

Overall SnackAbility

5
/10

Population: 25,226

HHI: 3,581
% White: 44.2%
% African American: 38.9%
% Asian: 1.6%
More on Grandview: PhotosData

Grandview is a city in Jackson County, Missouri, United States. The population was 24,475 at the 2010 census.

Overall SnackAbility

5
/10

Population: 5,658

HHI: 3,584
% White: 54.5%
% African American: 15.7%
% Asian: 5.5%
More on St. Robert: Data

Olivette, MO

Overall SnackAbility

9
/10

Population: 7,830

HHI: 3,645
% White: 53.1%
% African American: 25.6%
% Asian: 11.2%
More on Olivette: PhotosData

Olivette is an inner-ring suburb of St. Louis, located in St. Louis County, Missouri, United States. The population was 7,737 at the 2010 census.

Kansas City, MO

Overall SnackAbility

5
/10

Population: 476,974

HHI: 4,004
% White: 55.5%
% African American: 28.5%
% Asian: 2.7%
More on Kansas City: PhotosData

Kansas City is the largest city in Missouri, United States. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city had an estimated population of 481,420 in 2016, making it the 37th largest city by population in the United States. It is the central city of the Kansas City metropolitan area, which straddles the Kansas-Missouri border. Kansas City was founded in the 1830s as a Missouri River port at its confluence with the Kansas River coming in from the west. On June 1, 1850 the town of Kansas was incorporated; shortly after came the establishment of the Kansas Territory. Confusion between the two ensued and the name Kansas City was assigned to distinguish them soon thereafter.

Hazelwood, MO

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

6
/10

Population: 25,505

HHI: 4,101
% White: 52.9%
% African American: 35.4%
% Asian: 3.6%
More on Hazelwood: PhotosData

St. Louis, MO

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

4
/10

Population: 314,867

HHI: 4,124
% White: 42.9%
% African American: 47.5%
% Asian: 3.1%
More on St. Louis: PhotosData

St. Louis is an independent city and major U.S. port in the state of Missouri, built along the western bank of the Mississippi River, on the border with Illinois. The city had an estimated 2016 population of 311,404, and is the cultural and economic center of the Greater St. Louis area, making it the largest metropolitan area in Missouri and the 19th-largest in the United States.

University City, MO

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

8
/10

Population: 34,922

HHI: 4,175
% White: 52.5%
% African American: 37.3%
% Asian: 4.0%
More on University City: PhotosData

University City is an inner-ring suburb of the city of St. Louis in St. Louis County, in the U.S. state of Missouri. The population was 35,371 in 2010 census.

Florissant, MO

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

8
/10

Population: 51,952

HHI: 4,366
% White: 55.7%
% African American: 35.2%
% Asian: 1.1%
More on Florissant: PhotosData

Florissant ) is a second-ring suburb of St. Louis, located in northern St. Louis County, Missouri, United States. The city had a total population of 52,158 in the 2010 census, making it the 12th-largest city in Missouri.

Raytown, MO

Overall SnackAbility

6
/10

Population: 29,334

HHI: 4,389
% White: 57.8%
% African American: 31.6%
% Asian: 0.9%
More on Raytown: PhotosData

Raytown is a city in Jackson County, Missouri, United States, and is a suburb of Kansas City. The population was at 29,526 in 2010 census. The mayor of Raytown is Michael McDonough.

St. Ann, MO

Source: Public domain
Overall SnackAbility

6
/10

Population: 12,864

HHI: 4,437
% White: 61.4%
% African American: 24.5%
% Asian: 4.8%
More on St. Ann: PhotosData

St. Ann is an inner-ring suburb of St. Louis in mid St. Louis County, Missouri, United States. The population was 13,020 at the 2010 census.

There You Have It – Diversity Across Missouri

If you’re looking for a scientific breakdown of diversity across Missouri, this is an accurate list.

If you’re curious enough, here are the least diverse places in Missouri:

  1. Savannah
  2. Weldon Spring
  3. Odessa

For more Missouri reading, check out:

Detailed List Of The Most Diverse Cities In Missouri For 2019

Rank City Population HHI
1 Grandview, MO 25,226 3,581
2 St. Robert, MO 5,658 3,584
3 Olivette, MO 7,830 3,645
4 Kansas City, MO 476,974 4,004
5 Hazelwood, MO 25,505 4,101
6 St. Louis, MO 314,867 4,124
7 University City, MO 34,922 4,175
8 Florissant, MO 51,952 4,366
9 Raytown, MO 29,334 4,389
10 St. Ann, MO 12,864 4,437
11 Bridgeton, MO 11,712 4,444
12 Charleston, MO 5,765 4,485
13 Overland, MO 15,901 4,579
14 Maryland Heights, MO 27,246 4,721
15 Carthage, MO 14,280 4,845
16 St. John, MO 6,426 4,915
17 Waynesville, MO 5,291 5,134
18 Caruthersville, MO 5,859 5,158
19 Ferguson, MO 20,927 5,284
20 Sikeston, MO 16,482 5,422
21 Marshall, MO 12,865 5,514
22 Jefferson City, MO 43,092 5,553
23 Creve Coeur, MO 18,259 5,672
24 Maplewood, MO 7,975 5,745
25 Clayton, MO 16,214 5,784
26 Columbia, MO 118,620 5,873
27 Richmond Heights, MO 8,466 5,943
28 Monett, MO 8,861 6,000
29 Bowling Green, MO 5,479 6,101
30 Bonne Terre, MO 7,138 6,188
31 Kennett, MO 10,271 6,194
32 Independence, MO 117,369 6,229
33 Berkeley, MO 9,014 6,290
34 Cameron, MO 9,904 6,379
35 Neosho, MO 11,983 6,395
36 Bellefontaine Neighbors, MO 10,751 6,407
37 Cape Girardeau, MO 39,092 6,515
38 Boonville, MO 8,388 6,641
39 Sedalia, MO 21,477 6,654
40 Blue Springs, MO 54,036 6,663
41 Warrensburg, MO 19,890 6,673
42 Manchester, MO 18,130 6,690
43 Branson, MO 11,228 6,714
44 Poplar Bluff, MO 17,112 6,723
45 Fulton, MO 12,807 6,734
46 Gladstone, MO 26,738 6,766
47 Chesterfield, MO 47,660 6,819
48 Belton, MO 23,299 6,841
49 St. Joseph, MO 76,819 6,863
50 St. Charles, MO 69,026 6,865
51 Black Jack, MO 6,941 6,875
52 Lee’s Summit, MO 95,270 6,921
53 Rolla, MO 20,013 7,075
54 Mexico, MO 11,528 7,151
55 Ladue, MO 8,591 7,275
56 Raymore, MO 20,358 7,282
57 Moberly, MO 13,775 7,310
58 Dellwood, MO 5,005 7,311
59 Springfield, MO 165,785 7,326
60 Ellisville, MO 9,463 7,326
61 Joplin, MO 51,540 7,330
62 Ballwin, MO 30,388 7,393
63 Webb City, MO 11,148 7,439
64 Battlefield, MO 5,986 7,453
65 Brentwood, MO 8,025 7,565
66 St. Peters, MO 56,375 7,601
67 Kirkwood, MO 27,659 7,607
68 Hannibal, MO 17,551 7,638
69 Shrewsbury, MO 6,180 7,659
70 Pleasant Hill, MO 8,321 7,676
71 Excelsior Springs, MO 11,555 7,677
72 Webster Groves, MO 23,069 7,697
73 Farmington, MO 18,047 7,699
74 O’fallon, MO 85,246 7,704
75 Eureka, MO 10,554 7,723
76 Kirksville, MO 17,519 7,735
77 Town And Country, MO 11,030 7,742
78 Greenwood, MO 5,771 7,802
79 Wildwood, MO 35,524 7,851
80 Dardenne Prairie, MO 12,938 7,875
81 Liberty, MO 30,602 7,884
82 Aurora, MO 7,431 7,888
83 Grain Valley, MO 13,480 7,898
84 Oak Grove, MO 7,921 7,932
85 Lake St. Louis, MO 15,371 7,964
86 Pevely, MO 5,721 7,978
87 Macon, MO 5,412 8,001
88 Chillicothe, MO 9,138 8,068
89 Richmond, MO 5,609 8,081
90 Pacific, MO 6,294 8,086
91 Jennings, MO 14,743 8,086
92 Lebanon, MO 14,610 8,164
93 Smithville, MO 9,274 8,173
94 Maryville, MO 11,855 8,194
95 Wentzville, MO 35,768 8,220
96 Bolivar, MO 10,654 8,324
97 Harrisonville, MO 10,025 8,337
98 Marshfield, MO 7,080 8,339
99 Kearney, MO 9,469 8,397
100 Willard, MO 5,426 8,406

About Chris Kolmar

Chris Kolmar has been in the real estate business for almost ten years now. He originally worked for Movoto Real Estate as the director of marketing before founding HomeSnacks.

He believes the key to finding the right place to live comes down to looking at the data, reading about things to do, and, most importantly, checking it out yourself before you move.

If you've been looking for a place to live in the past several years, you've probably stumbled upon his writing already.

You can find out more about him on LinkedIn or his website.